Blake Announces Nearly $7.5 Million in Liquid Fuels Payments for Local Municipalities

SCRANTON, March 2, 2020 – State Sen. John Blake (D-Lackawanna/Luzerne/Monroe) today announced that communities across Lackawanna County are the recipients of $7.48 million in liquid fuels payments to help with the maintenance of roads and bridges.

The announcement is part of a $487.5 million investment through PennDOT’s annual municipal liquid fuels distributions.  The payments to municipalities are based on a municipality’s population and miles of locally-owned roads.

“This funding is an important annual investment in our communities and into our local transportation infrastructure.  Significant increases in this funding to local communities were made possible by Act 89 of 2013, which I was proud to support,” Blake said. “The maintenance and upkeep of our roads and bridges is critical to the safety of our residents. Additionally, the City of Scranton, for the first time in years, got a positive bond rating involving the securitization of these increased liquid fuels dollars – and that was an important milestone in the City’s financial recovery.”

The following list includes the net allocation of liquid fuels payments for municipalities across Lackawanna County:

  • Scranton City: $2,320,105 (Population: 76,089; Miles: 263.38)
  • Carbondale City: $264,540 (Population: 8,891; Miles: 28.28)
  • Waverly Township: $66,549 (Population: 1,743; Miles: 9.92)
  • Benton Township: $141,029 (Population: 1,908; Miles: 31.29)
  • Carbondale Township: $37,312 (Population: 1,115; Miles: 4.77)
  • Clifton Township: $43,682 (Population: 1,480; Miles: 4.58)
  • Covington Township: $127,921 (Population: 2,284; Miles: 25.2)
  • Elmhurst Township: $46,620 (Population: 894; Miles: 8.83)
  • Fell Township: $98,055 (Population: 2,178; Miles: 16.86)
  • Glenburn Township: $53,475 (Population: 1,246; Miles: 8.86)
  • Greenfield Township: $141,572 (Population: 2,105; Miles: 30.32)
  • Jefferson Township: $164,996 (Population: 3,731; Miles: 27.99)
  • La Plume Township: $23,931 (Population: 602; Miles: 3.71)
  • Thornhurst Township: $26,125 (Population: 1,085; Miles: 1.59)
  • Madison Township: $121,778 (Population: 2,750; Miles: 20.68)
  • Newton Township: $150,017 (Population: 2,846; Miles: 28.59)
  • North Abington Township: $45,992 (Population: 703; Miles: 9.74)
  • Ransom Township: $71,831 (Population: 1,420; Miles: 13.36)
  • Roaring Brook Township: $123,056 (Population: 1,907; Miles: 25.91)
  • Scott Township: $210,649 (Population: 4,905; Miles: 34.92)
  • South Abington Township: $305,509 (Population: 9,073; Miles: 39.38)
  • Spring Brook Township: $146,985 (Population: 2,768; Miles: 28.13)
  • West Abington Township: $23,184 (Population: 250; Miles: 5.51)
  • Archbald Borough: $253,378 (Population: 6,984; Miles: 35.77)
  • Blakely Borough: $205,173 (Population: 6,564; Miles: 23.74)
  • Clarks Green Borough: $49,445 (Population: 1,476; Miles: 6.33)
  • Clarks Summit Borough: $179,859 (Population: 5,116; Miles: 24.48)
  • Dalton Borough: $51,042 (Population: 1,234; Miles: 8.2)
  • Dickson City Borough: $192,057 (Population: 6,070; Miles: 22.65)
  • Dunmore Borough: $443,376 (Population: 14,057; Miles: 52.29)
  • Jermyn Borough: $75,624 (Population: 2,169; Miles: 10.19)
  • Jessup Borough: $155,164 (Population: 4,676; Miles:19.61)
  • Mayfield Borough: $58,733 (Population: 1,807; Miles: 7.2)
  • Moosic Borough: $205,044 (Population: 5,719; Miles: 28.56)
  • Moscow Borough: $72,780 (Population: 2,026; Miles: 10.16)
  • Old Forge Borough: $284,252 (Population: 8,313; Miles: 37.38)
  • Olyphant Borough: $162,677 (Population: 5,151; Miles: 19.13)
  • Taylor Borough: $172,801 (Population: 6,263; Miles: 15.77)
  • Throop Borough: $123,792 (Population: 4,088; Miles: 13.59)
  • Vandling Borough: $21,151 (Population: 751; Miles: 2.02)

Blake noted that municipalities can use 20 percent of their annual net allocation of these funds for the purchase of new equipment for maintenance and upkeep of local roads and bridges.

In order to be eligible for liquid fuels, a roadway must be formally adopted as a public street by the municipality; meet certain dimension requirements; and be able to safely accommodate vehicles driving at least 15 mph.  

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Blake Announces Over $2 Million in School Safety Grants for Local Districts

SCRANTON, February 26, 2020 – State Sen. John Blake (D-Lackawanna/Luzerne/Monroe) today announced $2.08 million in School Safety and Security grants for 15 school districts across the 22nd District.

The grant funding announced today was part of a $52.5 million investment in school safety and security across the Commonwealth. The funding was approved by the School Safety and Security Committee which was established within the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency.

“The safety of our children and our teachers is critically important to the success of our learning environments,” Blake said. “Our school districts need adequate resources to properly assess and address the security needs of their facilities and the well-being of our students. I was proud to support the creation of this grant program in 2018 and applaud the Wolf administration for their continued work to improve all facets of our education system.”

The following school districts in the 22nd Senatorial District received funding:

  • Abington Heights School District: $40,000
  • Carbondale Area School District: $35,000
  • Dunmore School District: $35,000
  • East Stroudsburg Area School District: $494,969
  • Forest City Regional School District: $122,535
  • Lackawanna Trail School District: $30,000
  • Lakeland School District: $35,000
  • Mid Valley School District: $35,000
  • North Pocono School District: $40,000
  • Old Forge School District: $221,253
  • Pittston Area School District: $40,000
  • Pocono Mountain School District: $471,240
  • Riverside School District: $35,000
  • Scranton School District: $368,507
  • Valley View School District: $75,900

Blake noted that the grants awarded will be used for a wide variety of school safety needs across the region. Projects include performing school safety assessments; purchasing security-related technology and equipment; supporting school safety-related and behavioral-health trainings; preparing all-hazards plans; hiring school resource officers, school police officers, school counselors, social workers and school psychologists; and providing for trauma-informed approaches to education.

Eligible school entities include school districts, intermediate units, area vocational-technical schools, charter schools and private rehabilitative institutions. Act 44 created the School Safety and Security Committee, which reviews the grants.

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